Application: Discrimination when looking for a job – what migrants experience – economy

Whether by name, origin or religion: many people with an immigrant background experience discrimination when looking for a job. A survey by the employment portal Indeed now shows how severely immigrant applicants are affected by discrimination and what obstacles they face in order to apply. 502 workers with an immigrant background in Germany took part in the Yougov survey.

41% of the people questioned are often or sometimes victims of discrimination during an application. Women are particularly affected: around half of women are victims of discrimination, and around a third of men. Delal Atmaca, director general of the umbrella organization of migrant women’s organizations (Damigra), also makes this observation. Migrant women are said to be discriminated against on the basis of their origin and their sex. They encountered much higher barriers in the labor market, reports Atmaca: “Your applications are screened in advance and you are not even invited to job interviews.

There are many obstacles preventing applicants from finding employment. 43 percent of respondents feel that native German speakers are preferred. Just as many see prejudices against people with an immigrant background in HR departments. 37% said they had been discriminated against because of their name and 31% because of their nationality. 27 percent of respondents said they felt discriminated against because of their place or country of birth, around 26 percent felt disadvantaged because of their religion.

“Many people with an immigrant background grow up in Germany, go to school and study here – but this is not taken into account,” explains Atmaca von Damigra. “We need an honest debate, a serious overhaul, the dismantling of barriers and the fight against racism.”

37% feel under pressure that they have to do more than colleagues with no migratory background

In order to prevent discrimination in job applications, 35 percent of respondents favor structured job interviews and anonymous applications, which do not include names, gender and nationality.

Many people with an immigrant background are under pressure at work. They feel they have to do more than their non-migratory colleagues. 37% of respondents say they think they should work more for the same recognition.

Atmaca from the umbrella organization of migrant women’s organizations calls on businesses to do more here – in their own interests. “Diversity is an asset for businesses, communities and institutions,” she says. “Multilingualism and looking from other angles brings real benefits and not just a good image.” Respondents also want more appreciation. About half expect greater recognition from their employers for skills such as multilingualism, intercultural competence and adaptability.

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